DeSoto Caverns
Field Trips at DeSoto Caverns - Education Standards.jpg
 
 
 
 

Second grade

Our purpose is to create an intentional learning experience. To ensure that each student in every grade experiences educational enrichment that corresponds to their classroom learning we have created videos, downloadable handouts, quizzes, and more that corresponds to classroom learning.

Science

Social Studies

Field Trips at DeSoto Caverns - Science.jpg

 
 
 

first grade Science Content Standards


Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, & Dynamics


2.5

“Plan and carry out an investigation, using one variable at a time (e.g., water, light, soil, air), to determine the growth needs of plants.”

Supporting Curriculum

What do plants need in order to grow? What if you removed one of those things? How would it affect the plant's growth if they didn’t have light? Watch this video and let’s explore a world of no light and how it affects plant life!

Video

Quiz

Wasn’t that fun?! Here’s a quiz to take to see how much you have learned!


2.7

“Obtain information from literature and other media to illustrate that there are many different kinds of living things and that they exist in different places on land and in water (e.g., woodland, tundra, desert, rainforest, ocean, river)”

Supporting Curriculum

Did you know that a fish cannot live just anywhere, and a dog can’t live just anywhere. Just think if a fish and a dog swapped their homes. That wouldn’t work out so well would it? Golly Gee is going to share with you about the special sorts of animals that live in his world and why they live there. After watching the video, we have a fun quiz to see whether you can tell which animals belong to what habitat! 

Video

Quiz

Wasn’t that fun?! Here’s a quiz to take to see how much you have learned!


2.1

“Identify national historical figures and celebrations that exemplify fundamental democratic values, including equality, justice, and responsibility for the common good. Historical women characters are emphasized as well.”

Supporting Curriculum

Did you know that Ida Mathis made a big difference in the state of Alabama through her stands for equality for all! She believed that farmers regardless of their race, should learn about how to best farm their land. She also had tenants of all racial backgrounds that she taught how to farm, then sold the land to while assisting them with a regimen of how to keep the land producing the best crops! She also believed that women deserved the responsibility of voting and played a role in showing how women could make a big difference in the world. Her efforts for improving Alabama’s land, the relationship between farmers and bankers, her success in increasing in the value of Alabama property, and her educated speeches even got the attention of the President!

Video

Quiz

Wasn’t that fun?! Here’s a quiz to take to see how much you have learned!


2.2

“Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for  reconstructing the past.”

Supporting Curriculum

How do we know what happened in the past? What sorts of information do we look at in order to understand what happened before we were born? How about before our ancestors were born? Let’s watch this video to learn a little about what we can learn about our own past!

Video

Quiz

Wasn’t that fun?! Here’s a quiz to take to see how much you have learned!


2.3

“Use vocabulary to describe segments of time, including year, decade, score, and century.”

Supporting Curriculum

Let’s talk about time that has passed! How can you tell the difference between a long time ago, yesterday, today and tomorrow

Watch the video below to get some ideas!

Video

Quiz

Wasn’t that fun?! Here’s a quiz to take to see how much you have learned!


2.10

“Identify ways people throughout the country are affected by their human and physical environments. Examples: land use, housing, occupation. Comparing physical features of regions throughout the United States. Example: differences in a desert environment, a tropical rain forest, and polar region. Identifying positive and negative ways people affect the environment. Example: Positive: restocking fish in lakes, reforesting, cleared land. Negative — polluting water, littering roadways, eroding soil.”

Supporting Curriculum

For as long as we have existed, humans have been creating shelters from wind, rain, hot, cold, and animals. Shelters are created mostly as a response to the environment you are in. For instance, if you lived where there was a lot of snow, you would respond by wanting warm clothing and a fire and lots of blankets! But if you lived next to a hot beach, you would probably want a breezy home so that cool air would flow through the windows to cool you off. Every person in the world is affected by their environment. In this video you’ll learn about how I.W. Wright responded to Alabama’s cold winter in 1723 by going inside DeSoto Caverns in order to warm up! In the quiz below, you’ll share what you know about how we are affected by our environment, and how we can affect our environment too!

Quiz

Wasn’t that fun?! Here’s a quiz to take to see how much you have learned!


2.11

“Interpret legends, stories, and songs that contributed to the development of the  cultural history of the United States. Examples: American Indian legends, African-American stories, tall tales, stories of folk heroes”

Supporting Curriculum

Native Americans have a rich culture that developed the beginnings of the North American continent’s culture! We’d like to share with you more about the rich Native American culture that has been a part of our Caverns’ history.
 

Quiz

Wasn’t that fun?! Here’s a quiz to take to see how much you have learned!