DeSoto Caverns
Field Trips at DeSoto Caverns - High School Curriculum.jpg
 
 
 
 

Seventh grade

Our purpose is to create an intentional learning experience. To ensure that each student in every grade experiences educational enrichment that corresponds to their classroom learning we have created videos, downloadable handouts, quizzes, and more that corresponds to classroom learning.

Science

Social Studies

Field Trips at DeSoto Caverns - High School Science.jpg

 
 
 

Seventh grade Science Content Standards

Seventh-grade students experience a wide range of physical and psychological changes during this stage of development where peer perception and social interactions play major roles in life and learning. As students mature and become more independent, their sense of curiosity and discovery must be fostered as they are encouraged to develop the self-discipline necessary for mastery of concepts at a higher level.


Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, & Dynamics


7.6

“Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence regarding how resource availability impacts individual organisms as well as populations of organisms within an ecosystem.”

Supporting Curriculum

How are you able to discern whether an environment would be ideal for lots of animals or only a few animals? One of the first things you would evaluate would be the available resources for animals. Most animals require air, food, and a safe habitat where they can rest. It is more likely that more animals will thrive in lush areas such as the rainforest or The Great Barrier Reef (which is the world’s largest coral reef) than in the arctic or the desert. Yes, animals live in lots of bizarre harsh conditions, but the more access they have to water, food and shelter, the more likely that the location will be more populated with wildlife and have a more diverse ecosystem. For instance, although DeSoto Caverns is a beautiful safe location, due to the lack of sun and plant life, very few animals live inside of it in comparison to outside on the lush park above.

Quiz

Wasn’t that fun?! Here’s a quiz to take to see how much you have learned!


Unity & Diversity


7.16

“Construct an explanation based on evidence (e.g., cladogram, phylogenetic tree) for the anatomical similarities and differences among modern organisms and between modern and fossil organisms, including living fossils (e.g., alligator, horseshoe crab, nautilus, coelacanth).”

Supporting Curriculum

Today’s video is going to share with you that although animals have similarities, they are still very unique and even their fossils can be told apart. For instance, a Mastodon bone was found in DeSoto Caverns, and although Mastodons are similar to the modern elephant, even from looking at a single bone, a paleontologist can tell the difference between the animals. Isn’t that interesting!? In our quiz we are going to see if you can differentiate between cladogram and phylogenetic trees, so be certain to know those before the quiz. 

Video

Quiz

Wasn’t that fun?! Here’s a quiz to take to see how much you have learned!

Geography


7.1

“Describe the world in spatial terms using maps and other geographic representations, tools, and technologies. 

  • Explaining the use of map essentials, including type, projections, scale, legend, distance, direction, grid, and symbols Examples: type—reference, thematic, planimetric, topographic, globe and map projections, aerial photographs, satellite images distance—fractional, graphic, and verbal scales direction—lines of latitude and longitude, cardinal and intermediate directions ”

Supporting Curriculum

Maps have been used for thousands of years to navigate across this earth! Hernando DeSoto used them when he set sail and to this day we use maps, although ours are oftentimes attached to satellites and not old-school paper. It’s important to understand terms when discussing maps and this quiz is going to cover eight important terms.

Video

Quiz

Wasn’t that fun?! Here’s a quiz to take to see how much you have learned!